A Travellerspoint blog

Entries about cedar breaks

Utah Again, Day 2: Dead Duck

semi-overcast 76 °F

Note: No ducks die nor are any found dead in the course of this entry.
2A068C75-24EA-436C-B2D4-C7FC2C639E86.jpeg2E74D5A2-0D53-4A54-8BAD-65B208EC8518.jpegF94191F6-B492-4FC1-8CEE-C170A22EBBEC.jpegC21578F7-0BA4-4ECC-BF90-F402C69163C0.jpeg35ECDFF2-203A-4E19-9ED6-C4C5E7717EF2.jpeg5B9B67A3-EA02-415F-9BA6-94C72A7427BE.jpeg
We went with Catherine's parents, her Aunt Mary and Uncle Joe, and her cousin Justin on a hike at Cedar Breaks National Monument. This was one we didn't do last year, which went to a place called Spectra Point.
2BC95FEE-DCC1-4172-84DD-7978F1AE1A99.jpeg40AC8DF8-A573-46B2-99C9-3AB801CAE03C.jpegDF03F2C0-A12C-4570-8839-2055216E0922.jpegC36FC702-3325-47A5-BB5D-29EFF2863F67.jpeg6F5F0E94-9BC2-4826-B0CC-CF4C3D7156D6.jpegDA4329B3-8FB3-4D95-9A2A-C70FD7D94448.jpeg
Some pictures along our hike. The contrast between the forest and the amphitheaters is really incredible.
FE2A1FED-0E1F-4CA7-BDB6-43632D8A5C06.jpeg937013B5-8808-439F-B833-855C9EFAE7DC.jpegF81BC731-796E-4634-B505-68DE8D3C8895.jpeg573214A1-41B6-491F-98E1-9638DA639EBC.jpeg3E61F2D5-2A64-492D-91F2-C3CA8FC77C43.jpeg
A historical building, and some more views.
CFDA779D-0CF2-440F-B0E7-8D05D13BC19E.jpegBBFDD96A-74F2-474A-A8AB-F0323A6A1D76.jpegDA2ECB65-818E-4055-9514-C590F9E1155B.jpeg490CE3F4-D7F2-4B46-9675-4113AEE4A3B7.jpeg2D9C3312-76D3-4925-9A92-161A32B85EB9.jpeg49EC14B0-7F20-456B-A7A6-833357E2E9E1.jpeg
We got to Spectra Point which was incredibly beautiful. It was amazing for the people who hadn't yet been to Brian Head to see how close this is to our resort.
A8D481DD-2100-4595-BFE5-69AEBFA235E9.jpeg290FE273-67A4-422E-BA38-AD4E9E89425B.jpeg
After the hike, Joe and Mary hosted a barbecue at the barbecue area at the resort. After dinner we made s'mores, and Ryan and Kristina's son Noah wanted to play "Dead Duck." When we agreed to play Dead Duck, dead duck had a great deal in common with Duck Duck Goose. In fact, it was indistinguishable, except for having fewer and less consistent rules. It quickly devolved into chasing, similar to a game that Daniel's sister Hilary created as a child called "Roll Hot Potato."

We then went to the bar at the resort and talked about going to Zion National Park tomorrow!

Posted by danielcatherine 05:15 Archived in USA Tagged bar duck zion barbecue spectra cedar_breaks historical_house dead_duck roll_hot_potato Comments (0)

Utah Day 4: Fry Bread Adventures

sunny 76 °F

Having done a lot of hiking and driving, we decided to have a slightly more relaxing day today. We went on a short drive around the area, and stopped at a few lookouts.
270_0D58DAD4-1F3F-471A-8B96-8CE62DC869B9.jpegD3B49BB8-A9D8-43C2-B584-C356051C6F57.jpegC4474441-3FA2-45C4-A057-3924424F67A6.jpegF70AF3B9-633F-4420-A1B8-7D911BFECCEE.jpeg270_42B39D1C-F3D5-4082-9BCD-9A5441DB3044.jpeg
Some views over the side of the amphitheater at Cedar Breaks.
F198994D-C930-4698-9E5B-0C6C7BFE9AE2.jpeg1F31E5C3-F8D4-4FCA-8C05-63111A23A81F.jpeg
There are a lot of old lava flows and cinder cones around the area. It's a very interesting landscape.
180_BF87551F-196A-483E-9DBE-A6B7FE32CD51.jpeg
Our last and most delicious adventure for the day was going to a restaurant in Parowan called Hamburger Patty's. They serve fry bread, which is a Native American bread. It can be served as a savory dish, such as a "Navajo taco," or as a sweet dessert-like food, with sugar and cinnamon or honey butter. We had it this time with honey butter, and it was delicious.

Posted by danielcatherine 11:59 Archived in USA Tagged lava drive amphitheater cedar_breaks cinder_cones fry_bread hamburger_patty's Comments (1)

Utah Day 2: Peaks and Petroglyphs

sunny 100 °F

E82DABFD-C202-4B0A-929D-5C5E3D4837D9.jpegA54CDD40-8251-426F-9717-5C1060338E2E.jpeg
Our first stop was lunch at a highly recommended Mexican/ Salvadoran restaurant in the town of Parowan, which is just down the hill from where we are staying. The food was delicious. Their chile rellenos are especially different from what they are normally like, but in a very good way.
270_D1AC6E07-AAF8-4F0C-B822-0A40C23D67A8.jpeg7148FBD2-E8F1-4300-BBD1-EC81377571F7.jpeg
We then drove to the Parowan Gap.
990F5623-3126-4807-9C4A-08F8A38EEF74.jpeg41C31E6F-4D8E-4DAC-93A4-1C35C5CBACFF.jpeg
Which is the location of the famous Parowan Petroglyphs. These were carved into the stone by various Native American tribes over the years. It seems as though the area was a common stopping point during migrations or hunting expeditions, and that various groups over the years added to these glyphs. There are various possible explanations for the different images, with different tribes and archaeologists sometimes having very divergent ideas of what they might have meant. It is interesting that the local tribes were generally agricultural: we had a bit of a discussion about the relationship between agriculture and religion, and how ceremonial images might become more important to a culture that farms rather than hunts for their living.
62024674-8309-4AF2-92AF-F1E5366731E5.jpeg270_C28B5443-8EF4-4164-9AC3-E8A8B4AC8544.jpeg2D883044-DF64-4E2B-A75C-0A58E48354B4.jpeg34ED36EC-CDD0-4D85-9328-0F72CB1D9DE4.jpeg270_C27BDD82-C1A4-48B1-9D29-1529B1828D02.jpeg270_F16FDDBC-EB75-47AA-A8FB-6EAEAC2B032D.jpeg270_7AF264A7-35F9-4644-8CFC-8A2D75DF432A.jpeg270_3559B8B9-3C87-4A96-A9FA-C01DA5998FC2.jpeg270_2D232150-9217-4BA8-8875-A84F63746EFA.jpeg270_BFABD338-33E8-4DD9-8ED7-F2BBB3AE1A27.jpeg270_E22B618C-2DBB-439F-9BFD-77B952946314.jpeg270_6C503C14-781A-4196-B824-9E58209DF9B8.jpeg
There are petroglyphs in most of these images, especially on the darker parts of the rock. Some of them seem to depict astronomical events, such as meteors falling to earth. A modern observer is likely to see some of the figures as aliens (some of the human figures have what look like antennae) but it is important not to read too much into your own interpretation (these figures could simply be, for instance, a shaman wearing antlers). It is hard to imagine what caused people to carve these things into the rock. You wish that you could understand what they were thinking and why they organized the images the way they did.
F9786E31-EAB0-4096-B90C-2AE2877FF4CE.jpeg0FE892DD-D397-4121-8DF7-FBFE686D9DF6.jpegCE11360A-4C79-45C2-B525-D079181DFB25.jpeg
We also stopped briefly at the Dinosaur tracks site, also in the Parowan Gap. Since it was very hot we didn't do much of a hike there.
270_372371AE-DDF6-4129-B374-92D97EAD8B0A.jpeg8F4CD4D4-8CA6-4CFB-8EA4-B9EBFB4BB7A4.jpegECBA6BAE-82B0-4504-8D03-6F8A6086921C.jpeg180_14216CC3-FCA5-42A7-B2ED-8C8A942796BD.jpeg
Next we went to Cedar Breaks National Monument, where we could see the "Chessmen," supposedly formations that look like chessmen but in fact formations that just look like rocks. Nevertheless, it was beautiful.
B2978EAD-A04A-40AF-8029-594C112D1ADB.jpegADD4FCF7-0B96-4768-8091-D4C39A812255.jpeg270_6801E118-BC3B-43DF-AFE9-8C3484E523C8.jpegA6AC87E9-9209-41BA-AEF2-8F73299A97F7.jpegD7CAEFC3-7D5A-4CA4-AB0D-DED0EA229C06.jpeg0165E8B0-B79C-4B39-881D-FBF57EBB9D29.jpegCD46923A-ABA2-419B-8390-239290D67F2E.jpeg0594C622-F1C9-4438-B161-B1314FDB4B57.jpeg
These "amphitheaters" in the sides of mountains seem very common here. They are all like miniature Grand Canyons.
270_7AE20075-05D3-4B39-A60E-8A6F2AFACAB1.jpeg
You are able to drive to the top of Brian Head peak, which we did.
270_D387BF4E-492C-4A9E-8F1E-9A968F24DDC3.jpeg270_5D67B64E-F8C9-41C5-A7B4-94BC21192603.jpeg
It is over 11,000 feet high.
270_C07912CD-E19D-4E40-B574-0E3D72DC571C.jpeg27D7F5A3-4249-4AD5-9DEA-32BC0DC8831D.jpeg
There is a small shelter at the top which was nice to shield us from the wind.
180_10344D34-1710-4B55-BCA0-9A57CD8B8B3C.jpegB2BA759A-E5FD-4EB1-97C7-4CBD48DCAE76.jpegC4E0B13B-9B07-4C68-A380-C84965D10AE9.jpeg5D254FD2-9404-4E3D-B193-41749D1D2769.jpeg571D63AD-1257-4582-908F-5C26A8E9D4A9.jpeg270_6EB3D2E6-6E76-4F3D-886C-07FA7E17DF4D.jpeg
We watched the sunset from the peak and then headed back down to our resort.

Posted by danielcatherine 15:06 Archived in USA Tagged mountains food petroglyphs dinosaurs amphitheater peaks parowan brian_head cedar_breaks chessmen Comments (1)

(Entries 1 - 3 of 3) Page [1]