A Travellerspoint blog

Entries about parowan

Utah Again, Day 4: Vote for Pedro

Pronounced "Peedro"

overcast 72 °F

1E65FD98-2EB3-432A-BD92-DAF2C7915523.jpegF842EA47-7EFE-4D8B-9B36-C3AF345FA935.jpegCD20C559-C6FA-4683-9FD0-7D2DD5594024.jpegFB7CABA4-86F8-448E-A6D0-0B9ECCC3D4AA.jpeg
Today was a somewhat less eventful day. We slept in a bit and then decided to drive to Parowan to buy some groceries. Catherine texted everyone to see what they were doing, but no one really responded. It seems that most of them were outside of phone service at the time. Luckily, Kristina messaged back after a bit, so she came with us. We decided first to go see the Parowan Petroglyphs. We've written about them before: they are fascinating images and well worth seeing. Inside the Parowan Gap it is easy to imagine how it would have looked in ancient times when people stopped here and carved art into the walls for whatever reason they had.
5FF71C8F-329E-47B6-B7D7-B505192A1F83.jpeg
BEC9C00C-9D95-4047-B81A-454937330D98.jpeg
(This picture was added in an edit on 6/23/21. Catherine and Kristina had insisted on Daniel posing like the guy on the Hamburger Patty's sign).
After that we went to Hamburger Patty's, a restaurant we had visited last year. Daniel got the "Indian Taco," which is served on frybread and was very good. We also had frybread with honey butter for dessert. We enjoyed it and Kristina did too. After that we went to the Parowan Market to get some supplies for our dinner tonight. It was really nice to catch up with Kristina after not having seen her in person for over a year.

Catherine's parents came over for dinner, and so did Nick and Crystalynne and their kids. We had the bierocks that we had picked up in Tehachapi on our way here: the kids had pepperoni pizza bierocks and the adults had the traditional beef, onion, and cabbage. They were very good. We also had a cherry pie that we had bought at the Parowan Market for dessert. Side note: the cherry pie was difficult to slice so Catherine served it as a cherry compote. Cecilia gobbled it up and said "thank you for the cherry compost, Auntie."

After dinner we went over to Catherine's Uncle Joe and Aunt Mary's condo to play games for a little. We played "Just One," a game where you try to give one-word clues to get someone to guess another word. As always, we had a lot of laughs.

CE1BAA00-E127-44A7-842D-B89059B990BB.jpeg
Daniel brought his telescope on this trip so that we could have an astronomy night. Cedar Breaks National Monument is a dark sky site. Unfortunately, it was somewhat cloudy. We set up the telescope at the resort instead of going into the National Monument for the dark skies, since it was unlikely that we would have been able to see much anyway. We were able to look at the moon as well as a few stars. It might be possible to look at some other things later on during the trip. Catherine's parents, her Uncle Joe and Aunt Mary and Justin, and Ryan and Kristina came down to look through the telescope. After that, we asked Ryan and Kristina if they would teach us to play Pedro.
624B95DF-E2DE-4AC8-9249-AEF5C2D2F391.jpeg70087E94-EE5A-458A-82F0-E7E4C6D28C47.jpeg
Pedro is a card game, and it is pronounced Peedro. It is very popular in San Benito County, California, where Catherine's dad's family is from. It is a trick-taking game, which Catherine (having tried to learn it as a young child) described as "the most bizarre game in the world." When we learned it, it wasn't actually all that bizarre. Catherine has sometimes referred to some of her family members as having a "Pedro Brain," and tonight she began to suspect she might just have a Pedro brain after all. It was similar in some ways to 500, the game we play with Daniel's family. We are hoping to teach 500 to Ryan and Kristina later on during the trip.

Posted by danielcatherine 07:17 Archived in USA Tagged market dinner games pedro petroglyphs astronomy parowan hamburger_patty's bierocks frybread indian_taco just_one Comments (1)

A Note to Our Readers/ Utah Day 6, 7, and 8

We apologize for not having finished our blog last year. We had a poor internet connection, and then when we got home various responsibilities made it hard to finish the blog and it kind of slipped our minds. However, we are now starting another trip and would like to blog about it, so we felt we should recap the last three days of last year's trip.

Utah Day 6: July 10th, 2020
48FD4392-B43D-42AB-A21F-647722A81551.jpeg5553095B-18C7-4C0E-AA28-6AA01DDA6E8E.jpegFC2BFD6F-8EBA-4595-9E38-E41F293E8916.jpegE8DBBF46-F5EC-4A69-86EA-14F30727EEA8.jpegD62AA8DA-FCA0-4CC4-B97F-F82A00C6D871.jpeg
We went for a hike at Cedar Breaks, which was relaxing after the heat and intensity of Zion the day before.
CFA1B9F5-5574-4DCA-9B0A-DA8E8473C784.jpeg23BD641B-77DD-448F-AFFB-FA69DC520699.jpeg1932DEDE-D9DE-4B9D-80D0-5002E2ED673E.jpeg6D1C1B4A-8D94-42DE-807B-2BD8416F6CDA.jpeg721AFAC1-EA06-4BAE-80F2-074F2674B430.jpeg2B73E52B-B84F-4859-AEE9-3C024B4DA9A8.jpeg59079B31-B55F-4B42-AE32-00DD4CA7974F.jpeg
The short hike provided some amazing views.
F6280D3A-B9D9-4FD7-BC29-CD972BFD5E76.jpegE4B22EDE-65AC-4DF0-9C9F-E7BB2784AF05.jpeg
We went for a drive and saw the nearby lakes.
27552344-24E6-4C2A-AD10-7D48D4B4BBC7.jpegDA418787-44BC-437E-94D6-0CC6A2CBB4AE.jpegE24F03AF-CB94-4E3E-A6DB-9E5522AC63C2.jpeg4EEC0664-3A90-4B07-9B35-4B002950C2FD.jpeg18CB759E-8E6F-489B-942E-DE4CAB17B433.jpeg
Then we tried Sasquatch Donuts. It is the strangest doughnut place we've seen, but one of the best. It seems that there is constantly a DJ and dancing going on, and that the doughnuts are delicious.

Utah Day 7: July 11th, 2020
85CA94BD-F7B9-43B7-91EC-4061BDF0259D.jpeg55822EB9-ED81-438C-8FF7-7CAFA48CC3E9.jpegB6E04CC2-0E67-430F-B4D1-6D1450E862CA.jpeg37B4B1DE-5D62-4788-842D-E7BA5016AB3A.jpeg54592A32-0830-435D-B285-71B62ADDA825.jpeg49F916A5-A15B-4376-84C1-F130DBB3DD00.jpeg91BD17EE-25BB-43EB-A6DE-F28C95E8D8FA.jpeg7CB742DC-1530-4422-8853-DB8FCE402FF6.jpeg
We went on a drive around the area, past Cedar Breaks and the lakes. It was interesting exploring the overall area.
E4EBAAA8-4D8B-431A-AE94-4643D2BE11B5.jpeg
We ate at a Chinese restaurant in Parowan...
1D12FB82-7A8F-4EFC-AC30-09FF0A1320C3.jpeg
That had images from old books on the table. Apparently they're concerned about witches...
D41899B0-D478-4FA3-A868-365C92166EE7.jpeg
We also tried Cheerwine, one of the sodas we bought at the grocery store. It was delicious!

Utah Day 8: July 12th, 2020
This was the day we left. Anthony and Katie's car began to make awful brake noises as we approached Las Vegas, so we ended up stuck in Las Vegas for about four hours. What would you do with four hours in Vegas? Apparently go to a small Mexican restaurant and then sit in a tire shop.
FB727D04-5AA5-4DFE-A1B5-949B38B3ABB8.jpeg8952FEAE-A26C-4B36-AA33-618E8DA3DBD7.jpeg

We will be updating the blog for our trip this year, where we seem to have much better internet access.

Posted by danielcatherine 19:32 Archived in USA Tagged las_vegas utah chinese tires doughnuts sasquatch parowan brian_head cheerwine Comments (0)

Utah Day 2: Peaks and Petroglyphs

sunny 100 °F

E82DABFD-C202-4B0A-929D-5C5E3D4837D9.jpegA54CDD40-8251-426F-9717-5C1060338E2E.jpeg
Our first stop was lunch at a highly recommended Mexican/ Salvadoran restaurant in the town of Parowan, which is just down the hill from where we are staying. The food was delicious. Their chile rellenos are especially different from what they are normally like, but in a very good way.
270_D1AC6E07-AAF8-4F0C-B822-0A40C23D67A8.jpeg7148FBD2-E8F1-4300-BBD1-EC81377571F7.jpeg
We then drove to the Parowan Gap.
990F5623-3126-4807-9C4A-08F8A38EEF74.jpeg41C31E6F-4D8E-4DAC-93A4-1C35C5CBACFF.jpeg
Which is the location of the famous Parowan Petroglyphs. These were carved into the stone by various Native American tribes over the years. It seems as though the area was a common stopping point during migrations or hunting expeditions, and that various groups over the years added to these glyphs. There are various possible explanations for the different images, with different tribes and archaeologists sometimes having very divergent ideas of what they might have meant. It is interesting that the local tribes were generally agricultural: we had a bit of a discussion about the relationship between agriculture and religion, and how ceremonial images might become more important to a culture that farms rather than hunts for their living.
62024674-8309-4AF2-92AF-F1E5366731E5.jpeg270_C28B5443-8EF4-4164-9AC3-E8A8B4AC8544.jpeg2D883044-DF64-4E2B-A75C-0A58E48354B4.jpeg34ED36EC-CDD0-4D85-9328-0F72CB1D9DE4.jpeg270_C27BDD82-C1A4-48B1-9D29-1529B1828D02.jpeg270_F16FDDBC-EB75-47AA-A8FB-6EAEAC2B032D.jpeg270_7AF264A7-35F9-4644-8CFC-8A2D75DF432A.jpeg270_3559B8B9-3C87-4A96-A9FA-C01DA5998FC2.jpeg270_2D232150-9217-4BA8-8875-A84F63746EFA.jpeg270_BFABD338-33E8-4DD9-8ED7-F2BBB3AE1A27.jpeg270_E22B618C-2DBB-439F-9BFD-77B952946314.jpeg270_6C503C14-781A-4196-B824-9E58209DF9B8.jpeg
There are petroglyphs in most of these images, especially on the darker parts of the rock. Some of them seem to depict astronomical events, such as meteors falling to earth. A modern observer is likely to see some of the figures as aliens (some of the human figures have what look like antennae) but it is important not to read too much into your own interpretation (these figures could simply be, for instance, a shaman wearing antlers). It is hard to imagine what caused people to carve these things into the rock. You wish that you could understand what they were thinking and why they organized the images the way they did.
F9786E31-EAB0-4096-B90C-2AE2877FF4CE.jpeg0FE892DD-D397-4121-8DF7-FBFE686D9DF6.jpegCE11360A-4C79-45C2-B525-D079181DFB25.jpeg
We also stopped briefly at the Dinosaur tracks site, also in the Parowan Gap. Since it was very hot we didn't do much of a hike there.
270_372371AE-DDF6-4129-B374-92D97EAD8B0A.jpeg8F4CD4D4-8CA6-4CFB-8EA4-B9EBFB4BB7A4.jpegECBA6BAE-82B0-4504-8D03-6F8A6086921C.jpeg180_14216CC3-FCA5-42A7-B2ED-8C8A942796BD.jpeg
Next we went to Cedar Breaks National Monument, where we could see the "Chessmen," supposedly formations that look like chessmen but in fact formations that just look like rocks. Nevertheless, it was beautiful.
B2978EAD-A04A-40AF-8029-594C112D1ADB.jpegADD4FCF7-0B96-4768-8091-D4C39A812255.jpeg270_6801E118-BC3B-43DF-AFE9-8C3484E523C8.jpegA6AC87E9-9209-41BA-AEF2-8F73299A97F7.jpegD7CAEFC3-7D5A-4CA4-AB0D-DED0EA229C06.jpeg0165E8B0-B79C-4B39-881D-FBF57EBB9D29.jpegCD46923A-ABA2-419B-8390-239290D67F2E.jpeg0594C622-F1C9-4438-B161-B1314FDB4B57.jpeg
These "amphitheaters" in the sides of mountains seem very common here. They are all like miniature Grand Canyons.
270_7AE20075-05D3-4B39-A60E-8A6F2AFACAB1.jpeg
You are able to drive to the top of Brian Head peak, which we did.
270_D387BF4E-492C-4A9E-8F1E-9A968F24DDC3.jpeg270_5D67B64E-F8C9-41C5-A7B4-94BC21192603.jpeg
It is over 11,000 feet high.
270_C07912CD-E19D-4E40-B574-0E3D72DC571C.jpeg27D7F5A3-4249-4AD5-9DEA-32BC0DC8831D.jpeg
There is a small shelter at the top which was nice to shield us from the wind.
180_10344D34-1710-4B55-BCA0-9A57CD8B8B3C.jpegB2BA759A-E5FD-4EB1-97C7-4CBD48DCAE76.jpegC4E0B13B-9B07-4C68-A380-C84965D10AE9.jpeg5D254FD2-9404-4E3D-B193-41749D1D2769.jpeg571D63AD-1257-4582-908F-5C26A8E9D4A9.jpeg270_6EB3D2E6-6E76-4F3D-886C-07FA7E17DF4D.jpeg
We watched the sunset from the peak and then headed back down to our resort.

Posted by danielcatherine 15:06 Archived in USA Tagged mountains food petroglyphs dinosaurs amphitheater peaks parowan brian_head cedar_breaks chessmen Comments (1)

(Entries 1 - 3 of 3) Page [1]